Critical Writing – considerations

Having set aside the first draft of my orchestrated version of my composition, I am now turning my attention to my Critical Review.

In the process of undertaking various pieces of research for this, I came across the following website:
http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/ld/resources/writing/writing-resources/critical-writing

The most important aspects of this article are here so that I can refer to them as I write my essay:
The academic voice will involve:
* A healthy scepticism – but not cynicism
* Confidence – but not cockiness or arrogance
* Judgement that is critical but not dismissive
* Opinions without being opinionated
* Careful evaluation of published works – not serial shooting at random targets
* Being fair by assessing fairly the strengths / weaknesses of other people’s ideas and writings without prejudice
* Making judgements on the basis of considerable thought and all available evidence as opposed to assertions without reason

When using quotes:
* Interpret them for the reader; explain their relevance, discuss their validity, show how they relate to other evidence in the essay.

Paragraphs:
* Switch paragraphs when moving between descriptive (factual) and critical writing.
* Each critical paragraph should introduce a point you want to make, you should then make that point with suitable evidence, and then reflect critically on the point you are making
* Need to explain why any descriptive text information is relevant.  What does it contribute to your argument? You as the writer must make the link for the reader; you mustn’t expect them to.

Line of Argument:
* This must run through the essay from the Introduction to the Conclusion
* This will ensure continuity through your essay structure

Questions to ask prior to submission:
* Balance the descriptive and critical writing
* Why should the reader be convinced? Are there gaps in the logic?
* Is the conclusion preceded by well supported analysis and argument?